1. f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

     faig ahmeds Embroidered Art 

    When you think of traditional carpets from Azerbaijan, the thought of contemporary art does not quickly spring to mind… but these beautiful, and modern works will change that. Faiq Ahmed, a native of the Eurasian nation, has taken his countries old-school art form and brought it beautifully into the current era, deconstructing the ancient process of weaving and adapting it to todays contemporary art forms.

    (via thecutups)

     
  2. archiemcphee:

    As part of a tour put on by an organization called The Mystical Arts of Tibet, a group of Tibetan Buddhist monks from the Drepung Loseling Monastery in India recently visited the Crow Collection of Asian Art in Dallas, Texas. They were there for a weeklong residency during which they constructed this magnificent Tantric Buddhist mandala sandpainting.

    The monks will spend up to eight hours a day working together on one of their sandpaintings. The process starts with an opening ceremony and the consecration of work site.

    Each work begins as a drawing, the outline of the mandala. Then, colored sand is poured from traditional metal funnels called chak-purs. Each monk holds a chak-pur in one hand, while running a metal rod on its grated surface; the vibration causes the sands to flow like liquid.

    Once the sandpainting has been completed it is ceremoniously destroyed using a ritual vajra.

    "The sands are swept up and placed in an urn; to fulfill the function of healing, half is distributed to the audience at the closing ceremony, while the remainder is carried to a nearby body of water, where it is deposited. The waters then carry the healing blessing to the ocean, and from there it spreads throughout the world for planetary healing."

    Click here to learn more about The Mystical Arts of Tibet

    [via My Modern Metropolis]

     
  3. archiemcphee:

    Do you ever wonder what your toys get up to when you aren’t around? Malaysian photographer Zahir Batin stages fantastic scenes using his Star Wars figurines that demonstrate some awesome possibilities, which range from cute and playful to action-packed or downright somber. A group of Stormtroopers hang out with some sweet chicks while another pair takes the day off to go fishing. Epic battles take place and those who survive bury and mourn their fallen comrades.

    What’s more, over on Facebook Batin freely shares the techniques he uses to achieve these shots and encourages other people to give it a try. For many of the photos he uses strings, wires and twigs to position the action figures and then simply removes those supports from the final images using Photoshop.

    Head over to DeviantART, 500px or Facebook to check out many more of Zahir Batin’s wonderful photos.

    [via Design Taxi]

     
  4. zoetica:

    Five Stages Of Inebriation, ca.1863-1868 / Photographer Charles Percy Pickering

    Stage 1: The Sober Stage

    Stage 2: The Buzz

    Stage 3: The Party Stage

    Stage 4: The Downfall

    Stage 5: Regret

    Dated from period of Pickering’s location at 612 George Street
    The photographs illustrate drunkenness in five stages, played by a male subject in a studio. Possibly commissioned by a local temperance group for educative purposes, the photographs may also have been used by an engraver for illustrations. The penultimate frame of the drunk in a wheelbarrow resembles S.T. Gill’s watercolour ‘Ease without Opulence’, 1863 (PXC 284/30). In 1866, NSW Premier James Martin introduced the Drunkard’s Punishment Bill — notes by Curator of Photographs, 2007. The printed studio mark on reverse reads “Photographic Artist. C. Pickering, 612 George Street, near Wilshire’s Buildings, Sydney”

    Charles Percy Pickering / Via Flickr: statelibraryofnsw

    (Source: thecivilwarparlor)

     
  5. mymodernmet:

    These spectacular photographs reveal the amazingly tiny details of the life of snails. Using a macro approach, Ukrainian photographer Vyacheslav Mishchenko gets up close and personal to capture a variety of miniature landscapes as the little creatures go about their daily lives. With great patience and a steady hand, the artist obtains crisp, sharp details that seem unbelievable when viewers consider how small the scenes really are in comparison to our everyday surroundings.

     
  6. opticoverload:

    checkkmybrainn:

    lohrien:

    Hand Painted Mugs by Susan Fields

    Phwoar, check out those mugs.

    (via der-tod-ist-ein-dandy)

     
  7. mymodernmet:

    24-year-old photographer Asher Svidensky recently traveled to west Mongolia with the intention of documenting the lives of traditional Kazakh eagle hunters, people who tame eagles for the purpose of hunting smaller animals.

    With the traditions typically laying in the hands of the boys and the men, the biggest surprise throughout the journey was Svidensky’s discovery of a young eagle huntress, 13-year-old Ashol Pan, the daughter of an experienced eagle hunter. These stunning photographs symbolize the potential future of the eagle hunting tradition as it expands beyond a male-only practice.

     
  8. labyrinthresource:

    What kind of magic spell to use to eviscerate my enemies and secure the realm?

    Original static manip

     
  9. leslieseuffert:

    Ben Kuhns (USA) - Ice Castles in Midway, Utah

    (via theproblemwithproblems)

     
  10. mymodernmet:

    Marutaro is an adorable pygmy hedgehog with some serious Internet fame. The Japan-based celebrity has over 47,000 followers on Twitter (@hedgehogdays), and more fans around the web. It’s not hard to see why—just look at that face! Marutaro enjoys getting his picture taken, and he is patient enough to pose with the silly, illustrated masks that his owners make for him.